The work I most often create is a reflection on landscapes and the places and people that inhabit them. As an image-maker and researcher, it is important for me to take a considered approach. Research is crucial in my practice and helps me understand who I am working with. Photography can easily create a subject-object dictum, where we have the ‘looked-at’ and ‘looked-upon’. To avoid such a scenario, I try to create a practice focused on co-creation where I open a conversation with the people or places that I photograph so that they feel they have a sense of control over how they are represented. Through the process of co-creation, the people appearing in the images decide how they are comfortable appearing within the frame of the photograph and I offer advice and support in relation to that. The work I do without the camera is the most important part of creating an ethical practice. In that work I can get to really know who I am creating the photograph with, allowing me to as faithfully as possible communicate with my audience about places and people.